AP World History Chapter 1

AP World History Chapter 1

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Section 1

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Pyramids

Front

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Date created

Mar 1, 2020

Cards (40)

Section 1

(40 cards)

Pyramids

Front

monumental architecture typical of Old Kingdom Egypt; used as burial sites for pharaohs.

Back

city-state

Front

a city and its surrounding lands functioning as an independent political unit.

Back

Phoenicians

Front

Semitic-speaking Canaanites living on the coast of modern Lebanon and Syria in the first millennium B.C.E. Famous for developing the first alphabet, which was adopted by the Greeks. From major cities such as Tyre and Sidon, these merchants and sailors explored the Mediterranean, and engaged in widespread commerce.

Back

Mesolithic

Front

The "middle" Stone Age, between the Paleolithic and the Neolithic ages. 12,000 - 8,000 B.C.E.

Back

Homo Erectus

Front

extinct species of primitive hominid with upright stature but small brain

Back

Huang He Civilization

Front

earliest civilization in China, centralized state from the start (political, ideology, ruler thought to connect heaven and earth, culture similar to ancient times)

Back

Homo Sapiens

Front

the species of humanity that emerged as most successful at the end of the Paleolithic., "wise, wise human being," a species that appeared in Africa between 150,000 and 200,000 years ago; they were the first anatomically modern humans

Back

Hammurabi's Code

Front

The first written codes of law during the Babylonian Empire, strict/ harsh punsihments, "an eye for an eye". Forst ever codified law

Back

Ice Age

Front

a cold period in which huge ice sheets spread outward from the polar regions, the last one of which lasted from about 1,900,000 to 10,000 B.C.

Back

Lydians

Front

Asia Minor, developed kingdom that was known for their rich gold deposits, began to set prices, were the first people to make and use coins for currency

Back

P'an Ku

Front

Mythic ancestor which ancient Chinese said was their creator.

Back

Theocracy

Front

A government controlled by religion or religious leaders

Back

Ziggurat

Front

a tiered, pyramid-shaped structure that formed part of a Sumerian temple

Back

Sumerians

Front

The people who dominated southern Mesopotamia through the end of the third millennium B.C.E. They were responsible for the creation of many fundamental elements of Mesopotamian culture-such as irrigation technology, cuneiform, and religious conceptions.

Back

Hammurabi

Front

Amorite ruler of Babylon (r. 1792-1750 B.C.E.). He conquered many city-states in southern and northern Mesopotamia and is best known for a code of laws, inscribed on a black stone pillar, illustrating the principles to be used in legal cases. (p. 34)

Back

Polytheism

Front

The belief in many gods

Back

Agricultural Revolution

Front

the time when human beings first domesticated plants and animals and no longer relied entirely on hunting and gathering

Back

Cuneiform

Front

a system of writing with wedge-shaped symbols, invented by the Sumerians around 3000 B.C.

Back

Egyptian Civilization

Front

civilization emerged in northern Africa along the Nile River by about 3000 B.C.E. It benefited from trade and influences from Mesopotamia, but it also produced its own distinct social structures and cultural expressions. Unlike Mesopotamia, civilization featured very durable and centralized institutions. Mathematical achievements and impressive architectural structures also characterized civilization.

Back

Judaism

Front

Monotheistic religion with its roots in the teachings of Abraham (from Ur), who is credited with uniting his people to worship only one god. According to Jewish teaching, Abraham and God have a covenant in which the Jews agree to worship only one God, and God agrees to protect his chosen people, the Jews.

Back

Neolithic Revolution

Front

(10,000 - 8,000 BCE) The development of agriculture and the domestication of animals as a food source. This led to the development of permanent settlements and the start of civilization., The shift from hunting of animals and gathering of food to the domestication of animals and the growing of food on a regular basis around 8,000 BC

Back

Zhou Dynasty

Front

Succeeded Shang Dynasty; alliances with regional princes and families (feudal system); overtook Yangtze River Valley (Middle Kingdom); invoked the "Mandate of Heaven"; Mandarin Chinese language; Confucious (philosopher)

Back

Slash and Burn Agriculture

Front

a farming technique in which trees are cut down and burned to clear and fertilize the land

Back

Monotheism

Front

belief in a single God

Back

Shang Dynasty

Front

Second Chinese dynasty (about 1750-1122 B.C.) which was mostly a farming society ruled by an aristocracy mostly concerned with war. They're best remembered for their art of bronze casting.The ruled in the yellow river valley . FIRST HISTORICAL CHINESE EMPIRE

Back

Barbarian

Front

a member of an uncivilized people

Back

Neolithic Age

Front

The New Stone Age between 8000 and 3000 B.C.E.; period in which adaptation of sedentary agriculture occurred; domestication of plants and animals accomplished.

Back

Bronze Age

Front

from 4000 to 3000 B.C.E.; increased use of plow, metalworking; development of wheeled vehicles, writing., a period in human history during which people began using bronze, rather than copper or stone, to fashion tools and weapons.

Back

Pharaoh

Front

the title of the ancient Egyptian kings

Back

Kush

Front

An African state that developed along the upper reaches of the Nile c. 100 B.C.E.; conquered Egypt and ruled it for several centuries.

Back

Civilization

Front

complex society with cities, organized government, art, religion, class divisions, and a writing system

Back

Mesopotamia

Front

first civilization located between the Tigris & Eurphrates Rivers in present day Iraq; term means "land between the rivers;" Sumerian culture

Back

Torah

Front

Judaism's most sacred text, consisting of the first five books of the Hebrew Bible

Back

Paleolithic Age

Front

The Old Stone Age, which lasted from 2.5 million to 8000 B.C. where the invention of tools, fire, and language took place. Nomadic hunters and gatherers

Back

Harappa

Front

Site of one of the great cities of the Indus Valley civilization of the third millennium B.C.E. It was located on the northwest frontier of the zone of cultivation, and may have been a center for the acquisition of raw materials.

Back

Catal Huyuk

Front

One of first true cities in history, created in the Neolithic Era in 6500 to 5500 BC, from which were created agriculture, trading, temples, housing, and religions, one of the world's first cities, remains were found in 1958 in modern Turkey

Back

Indus River Civilization

Front

(c. 3300-1700 BCE, flourished 2600-1900 BCE), was an ancient civilization that flourished in the Indus and Ghaggar-Hakra river valleys primarily in what is now Pakistan and western India, parts of Afghanistan and Turkmenistan; major cities were Harappa and Mohenjo-Daro

Back

Mohenjo-Daro

Front

Largest city of the Indus Valley civilization. It was centrally located in the extensive floodplain of the Indus River. Little is known about the political institutions of Indus Valley communities, but the large-scale implies central planning. (p. 48)

Back

Neolithic revolution

Front

The development of agriculture and the domestication of animals as a food source. This led to the development of permanent settlements and the start of civilization.

Back

Babylonians

Front

an ancient empire of Mesopotamia in the Euphrates River valley. It flourished under Hammurabi and Nebuchadnezzar II but declined after 562 B.C. and fell to the Persians in 539.

Back