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Article 7 of the Constitution

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Date created

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Cards (81)

Section 1

(50 cards)

Article 7 of the Constitution

Front

ratification process

Back

Natural Rights

Front

life, liberty, property (pursuit of happiness)

Back

Marbury v Madison

Front

1801 judicial review allows the supreme court to rule a law unconstitutional and void the law

Back

Regents of the University of California v Bakke

Front

1978 upheld affirmative action programs in school

Back

McCulloch v Maryland

Front

1819 established the constitution grants congress implied powers for implementing the expressed powers

Back

John Locke's Two Treatises of Government

Front

writing outlined the ideals of social contract theory and natural rights - dominant influence on Thomas Jefferson & first 3 paragraphs of dec of independence

Back

Popular Sovereignty

Front

all powers of government ultimately rest in the people

Back

Common Law derived from

Front

tradition and previous responses to situtions

Back

Mapp v Ohio

Front

1961 evidence obtained in violation of the 4th amendment - unreasonable search and seizure - could not be used in a state law criminal prosecution

Back

Article 1 of the Constitution

Front

the powers, eligibility requirements and limitations of the legislative branch

Back

Article 6 of the Constitution

Front

maintenance of previous debts, supremacy of the constitution, and oaths of office

Back

Dred Scott v Sanford was overturned when

Front

13, 14, 15th amendments were passed

Back

Article 4 of the Constitution

Front

the roles, rights, and privileges of the states and their citizens

Back

Natural Law

Front

laws universally organized by the virtue of human reason or human nature

Back

Miranda v Arizona

Front

1966 case found that a defendant had to be informed of his rights to consult an attorned for his testimony to be used in court

Back

Communism

Front

group of leaders dictate the allocation of resources to the entire population - no private property

Back

Inalienable Rights

Front

natural rights given to every person

Back

Communist Manifesto

Front

Karl Marx 1848 outlines the reasons and beliefs behind a communist structure of government

Back

Declaration of Independence

Front

outlines the political ideology of the american revolution and lays the foundation for the US Constitution

Back

Oligarchy

Front

rule by a small group of people

Back

Cherokee Nation v Georgia

Front

1831 ruled the cherokee nation did not have "original jurisdiction" to sue Georgia and the cherokee people were not a state

Back

Korematsu v US

Front

1944 ruled that japanese americans in internment camps was constitutional

Back

Monarchy

Front

one individual rules the entire country

Back

Gideon v Wainwright

Front

1963 ruled that courts were required to provide legal counsel to poor defendants in felony cases

Back

US Constitution

Front

1787 foundation for american government and is a blueprint for a constitutional government throughout the world

Back

Checks and Balances

Front

keeps one branch from becoming to powerful

Back

Social Contract

Front

individuals covenant with each other to create a form of government ex: preamble to the constitution

Back

Plessy v Furgeson

Front

1896 ruled that state laws requiring segregation in public and private sectors was unconstitutional, using "separate but equal"

Back

Article 2 of the Constitution

Front

the powers, eligibility requirements and limitations of the executive branch

Back

Example of Natural Law

Front

murder is wrong because it is against nature for one human to murder another

Back

The general theory for Communist Manifesto was

Front

as industrialization spreads, the workers will grow to resent the factory manager and owner as exploiting the labor of workers

Back

Communist Manifesto was the foundation for

Front

communist revolutionarise in europe, africa, and south america

Back

Article 3 of the Constitution

Front

the powers, eligibility requirements and limitations of the judicial branch

Back

Natural Law and Natural Rights extend beyond

Front

culture, society, or time period

Back

Tinker v Des Moines

Front

1969 students wearing black armbands to school to protest the vietnam war were within their constitutional rights

Back

Hammurabi's Code

Front

suggests a presumption of innocence and a rough outline that could act as a constitution; "eye for an eye"

Back

US Government

Front

democratic republic

Back

Separation of Powers

Front

3 branches

Back

Socialism

Front

the state redistributes resources from the wealthy to the poor and provides social services to the population

Back

Justinian's Code of Laws

Front

compilation and formal organization of roman laws dating back to the 6th century - foundation of jurisprudence during the reniassance

Back

Federalism

Front

power is shared between the branches, state, and national government

Back

Article 5 of the Constitution

Front

amendment process

Back

Common Law

Front

laws created and developed through judicial decision, by courts; case law.

Back

Republicanism

Front

elected reps determine the laws; certain rights are protected from the will of the people

Back

US v Nixon

Front

1974 Nixon tried to hold evidence in Watergate scandal - exercised checks and balances - president doesn't have absolute immunity from the judicial process

Back

Dred Scott v Sanford

Front

1857 african individuals sold to slaver were not and could not be citizens and did not have the rights protected in the constitution

Back

Direct Democracy

Front

every citizen has a direct vote in the government and for each policy; unmanageable because it's illogical for each person to cast a vote for each policy

Back

Roe v Wade

Front

1973 a woman has the rights to an abortion

Back

Brown v Board of Edu of Topeka

Front

1954 supreme court ruled in this case that segregation of public schools was unconstitutional - overturned plessy

Back

Magna Carta

Front

foundation for modern limited-government restricted the King of England's power

Back

Section 2

(31 cards)

10th Amendment

Front

protects powers of states and individuals that are not specifically listed in the constitution

Back

14th Amendment

Front

1868 guaranteed due process; slaves were considered US citizens and entitled to rights

Back

Reagnomics

Front

1981 double-digit unemployment and double-digit inflation - reduce government spending - reduce income tax and capital gains tax - reduce government regulation of corporations - control the money supply to reduce inflation

Back

1st Amendment

Front

protects against restrictions on right to freedom of speech, religion, press, petition, and assembly

Back

8th Amendment

Front

protects against cruel and unusual punishment

Back

2nd Amendment

Front

protects against restrictions of the right to bear arms

Back

7th Amendment

Front

protects the right to jury trial in civil cases

Back

18th Amendment

Front

1919 prohibition of alcohol

Back

Citizens United v FEC

Front

2010 restrictions on campaign spending by corporations and unions were violations of freedoms of speech

Back

24th Amendment

Front

1964 poll tax abolished

Back

26th Amendment

Front

1971 voting age is 18 rather than 21

Back

6th Amendment

Front

protects the right to a fair, speedy, and public trial; right to a lawyer, to confront accusers, and to an impartial jury

Back

15th Amendment

Front

1870 blacks could vote

Back

16th Amendment

Front

1913 allows for an income tax

Back

13th Amendment

Front

1865 outlawed slavery in the US right after civil war

Back

21st Amendment

Front

1933 repealed prohibition of alcohol

Back

Progressivism

Front

1890-1920 government is the agent of change, evolving to meet the needs of society

Back

4th Amendment

Front

protects against unlawful searches and seizures

Back

Revolution of 1800

Front

Thomas jefferson defeated John Adams - both parties respected the other leading to stability in government and politics

Back

Due Process

Front

legal obligation of the government to respect an individuals legal rights

Back

Political Action Committees

Front

raise money to support specific candidates for office who will turn support to their agendas Super PACs have no limits on contributions

Back

19th Amendment

Front

1920 right of voting is extended to women

Back

Great Society

Front

1964 LB Johnson followed FDR movement to end poverty and racial injustice in America - war on poverty - wellfare

Back

Sherman Anti-Trust Act

Front

1890 prohibited anti-competitive business practices and empowered federal government

Back

17th Amendment

Front

1913 direct election of senators by citizens

Back

Civil War

Front

1861-1865 expansion of federal power in states; major issue was state's rights - southern wanted to withdraw from union

Back

5th Amendment

Front

protects against unsupported accusations of wrongdoing, self-incrimination, double jeopardy

Back

3rd Amendment

Front

protects against quartering of troops in homes

Back

Lobbying

Front

attempting to persuade lawmakers to create legislation favorable to their interests

Back

New Deal

Front

1933 enacted economic changes in almost every aspect of american life

Back

9th Amendment

Front

protects rights not specifically listed

Back