AP English Language and Composition

AP English Language and Composition

memorize.aimemorize.ai (lvl 286)
Section 1

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Dyspeptic

Front

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Last updated

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Date created

Mar 1, 2020

Cards (50)

Section 1

(50 cards)

Dyspeptic

Front

Of or having indigestion or consequent irritability or depression.

Back

Motif

Front

A phrase, idea, or event that through repetition serves to unify or convey a theme in an essay or other discourse.

Back

Digression

Front

The use of material unrelated to the subject of a work.

Back

Synecdoche

Front

A figure of speech in which a part of something is used to represent the whole or, occasionally, the whole is used to represent a part.

Back

Bellicose

Front

Demonstrating aggression and willingness to fight.

Back

Aphorism

Front

Terse statement of unknown authorship which expresses a general truth or moral

Back

Euphemism

Front

Euphemisms are a more agreeable or less offensive substitute for a generally unpleasant word or concept.

Back

Anecdote

Front

A short and amusing or interesting story about a real incident or person.

Back

Languid

Front

Displaying or having a disinclination for physical exertion or effort; slow and relaxed.

Back

Infidel

Front

A person who does not believe in religion or who adheres to a religion other than one's own.

Back

Tacit

Front

Understood or implied without being stated.

Back

Dogmatic

Front

Inclined to lay down principles as incontrovertibly true.

Back

Diatribe

Front

A forceful and bitter verbal attack against someone or something.

Back

Antithesis

Front

Opposition or contrast of ideas through parallelism.

Back

Pernicious

Front

Having a harmful effect, especially in a gradual or subtle way.

Back

Innuendo

Front

An allusive or oblique remark or hint, typically a suggestive or disparaging one.

Back

Vex

Front

Make (someone) feel annoyed, frustrated, or worried, especially with trivial matters.

Back

Synesthesia

Front

When one kind of sensory stimulus evokes the subjective experience of another.

Back

Fallacy

Front

An incorrect belief or supposition based on faulty data, defective evidence, or false information.

Back

Antecedent

Front

Word, phrase, or clause referred to by a pronoun.

Back

Exhort

Front

Strongly encourage or urge someone to do something.

Back

Conceit

Front

A fanciful expression, usually in the form of an extended metaphor or surprising analogy between seemingly dissimilar objects.

Back

Allegory

Front

The device of using character and/or story elements symbolically to represent and abstraction in addition to literal meaning.

Back

Voracious

Front

Craving or consuming large quantities of food.

Back

Hubris

Front

Excessive pride that often affects tone.

Back

Litotes

Front

A form of understatement in which the negative of the contrary is used to achieve emphasis or intensity.

Back

Invective

Front

An emotionally violent, verbal denunciation or attack using strong, abusive language.

Back

Anaphora

Front

A sub-type of parallelism, when the exact repetition of words or phrases at the beginning of successive lines or sentences.

Back

Anachronism

Front

A person, scene, event or other element that fails to correspond with the appropriate time or era.

Back

Metonymy

Front

a figure of speech in which the name of one object is substituted for that of another closely associated with it.

Back

Ellipsis

Front

the omission of a word or several words necessary for a complete construction that is still understandable.

Back

Inductive Reasoning

Front

A method of reasoning in which a number of specific facts or examples are used to make a generalization.

Back

Cloistered

Front

Kept away from the outside world; sheltered.

Back

Homily

Front

This term literally means "sermon," but more informally, it can include any serious talk, speech, or lecture involving moral or spiritual advice.

Back

Apostrophe

Front

A figure of speech that directly addresses an absent or imaginary person or a personified abstraction, such as liberty or love.

Back

Zealous

Front

Having or showing zeal.

Back

Semantics

Front

The branch of linguistics that studies the meaning of words, their historical and psychological development, their connotations, and their relation to one another.

Back

Petulant

Front

Childishly sulky or bad-tempered.

Back

Non Sequitur

Front

A statement or idea that fails to follow logically from the one before.

Back

Consecrate

Front

Make or declare (something, typically a church) sacred; dedicate formally to a religious or divine purpose.

Back

Colloquial/Colloquialism

Front

The use of slang or informalities in speech or writing.

Back

Annotation

Front

Explanatory or critical notes added to a text.

Back

Doggerel

Front

Comic verse composed in irregular rhythm.

Back

Syllogism

Front

From the Greek for "reckoning together," a syllogism is a deductive system of formal logic that presents two premises that inevitably lead to a sound conclusion.

Back

Epigram

Front

A brief witty statement.

Back

Jargon

Front

Special words or expressions that are used by a particular profession or group and are difficult for others to understand.

Back

Pedantic

Front

An adjective that describes words, phrases, or general tone that is overly scholarly, academic, or bookish

Back

Ad Hominem

Front

Directed to or appealing to feelings or prejudices instead of to intellect or reason.

Back

Didactic

Front

Having an instructive purpose; intending to convey information to teach a lesson usually in a dry, pompous manner.

Back

Prose

Front

one of the major divisions of genre, prose refers to fiction and nonfiction, including all its forms.

Back