competency assessment

competency assessment

memorize.aimemorize.ai (lvl 286)
Section 1

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D02 (Opt. int) Describe common functions of behavior

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Last updated

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Date created

Mar 1, 2020

Cards (14)

Section 1

(14 cards)

D02 (Opt. int) Describe common functions of behavior

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Define behavior Defines function of behaviors ach behavior has a function, that is, a reason why it is being emitted. Behaviors are shaped by past consequences. Therefore, when a response is followed by a positive consequence, we are more likely to emit these responses in the future. 1. Attention maintained 2. Access to Tangible items 3. Escape from demands 4. Automatic or self stimulatory Defines attention maintained behaviors with example Defines escape maintained behaviors with example Defines access/tanglible maintained behaviors with example Defines automatically maintained behaviors with example

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F01 (Opt int) Describe the role of the RBT in the service delivery system INCOMPLETE

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B3 (Opt. in) Describe how you would assist with individualized assessment procedures (e.g. curriculum-based, developmental, social skills

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F04 (Opt int.) Identify methods to maintain professional boundaries (e.g., avoid dual relationships, conflicts of interest, social media contracts).

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Maintain professional and scientific relationships with the client Avoid dual relationships Avoid exploitative relationships Avoid conflict of interest Avoid social media contracts

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D01 - Identify the essential components of a written behavior reduction plan

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-Identify the target behavior to decrease -Collaborate with supervisor to create operational definition -Identify relevant situations in which the behavior would normally occur -Collect baseline on current levels of behaviors -Discuss intervention selection relevance based on function of behavior (describe how they would impose selected interventions (escape extinction, planned ignoring, DRI/DRO)

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B1 (op. int) Define and provide examples of behavior and the environment in observable and measurable terms.

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Behavior = an observable and measurable movement of an organism that results in a change in the environment behavior must be able to be objectively observed, as in they are open to anyone's observation and not dependent on anyone's subjective belief. Two different observers should be able to observe and measure the same type of behavior independently and in the same consistent manner. behavior must be quantifiable, or measurable, whether we are talking about rate, time, duration, frequency, etc. When in doubt about what constitutes a behavior, use the dead man's test: If a dead man can do it, it's not a behavior. Example: Suppose the target behavior is "yelling in classroom". If the goal is written as "Does not yell in classroom" does this pass the dead man's test? No. A dead man could refrain from yelling in the classroom. What is preferable? (Raising hand to request attention, giving the teacher a card labeled "help", using functional communication by saying "I need help", etc) Can a dead man do this?: · Lying down · Being knocked down by a gust of wind · Getting hit by a baseball Answer: Yes, a dead man can do all of these things. These things are either static states of an organism or movements of the body that resulted from independent physical forces. Both are excluded from the definition of behavior (Cooper, Heron & Heward, 2007). Other things that are not behavior: · Anxiety · And other mental states, such as: depressed, happy, silly, sad, being in a "bad" or "good" mood, etc. · Personality traits such as: confident, introverted, kind, agreeable, etc. · Can we observe and measure these things? Answer: no, we cannot, therefore these mental states are not behavior. There are a number of factors that can influence behavior, and it is important to communicate these with the supervisor immediately. This can include updates, such as medication changes, environmental changes (divorce, parent separation, or moving houses), or illness. Be sure to inform your supervisor as quickly as possible regarding any changes or other variables that might influence a client's behavior. A note or event line should be added to each graph to identify any of these changes, since they could impact the client's behavior.

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F05 (Opt. int) Identify methods to maintain client dignity

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Avoids harmful reinforcers Support's client's rights under law and Butterfly Effects Client Bill of Rights Obtains consent before sharing personal health information with other professionals Maintains confidentiality Success completes background check

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E01 (Opt int) Report other variables that might affect the client (e.g., illness, relocation, medication).

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Observe and record environmental and biological factors that may affect behavior (sleep, hunger, illness, etc) Observe and record if client is ill and report symptoms Observe and record medication taken and side effects Collect ABC data on maladaptive behaviors Observe and record positive adjustments to medication

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C01 (Opt. int) Identify the essential components of a written skill acquisition plan

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-Define target behavior to increase -Identify relevant situations in which skill must be used -Collect baseline on current performance -Begin training with the easiest skill, when the learner is more likely to be successful -Describe how to model and what instructions should be given -Describe how to increase behavior

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A1 (optional interview) Describe how to prepare for data collection

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-Have data sheet available -Uses timers, clickers, and other recording materials -Identifies target behavior -Record data immediately and accurately on data sheet -Graphs data

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C11 (Opt. int) Describe how to implement generalization and maintenance procedures

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Define response generalization (extent to which a learner emits untrained responses that are functionally equivalent to the trained target behavior) Define response maintenance (extent to which a learner continues to perform the target behavior after portion or all of the intervention responsible for the behavior's initial appearance in the learner's repetoire has been terminated) Define setting generalization (extent to which a learner emits the target behavior in a setting or stimulus situation that is different from the instructional setting) Provide an example of generalization across settings Provide an example of generalization across people Provide an example of generalization across stimuli

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C12 (Opt. int) Explain how to assist to with the training of stakeholders (e.g., family, caregivers, other professionals)

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-Is familiar with operational definition -Models correct/desired behaviors for stakeholders -Records data on stakeholders behavior -Reinforces desired behavior during session -Inform supervisor regarding acquisition of skills

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C02 (Opt. int) Describe how to prepare for the session as required by the skill acquisition plan

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-Verify program materials for each domain are available -Verify acquisition targets are stated -Verify reinforcer schedule is stated Pair with learner -Conduct preference assessment during session -Defines and demonstrates behavioral momentum -Defines and states benefits of using 80/20 rule -Identifies what antecedent manipulations need to be used for learner during program implementation

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F03 (Opt int) Explain how to communicate with stakeholders (family, caregivers, other professionals) as authorized.

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Use of objective statements State professional limitations Sites current literature Uses ABA terminology correctly Encourages caregivers to seek support and communicate with supervisor

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