AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY (crash course)

AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY (crash course)

memorize.aimemorize.ai (lvl 286)
Section 1

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physical geography

Front

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Last updated

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Date created

Mar 1, 2020

Cards (56)

Section 1

(50 cards)

physical geography

Front

spatial analysis on earth's natural phenomena

Back

infrastructure

Front

support systems in a region // (example) saudi arabia has developed desalination factories to remove salt from ocean water, thereby increasing the amount of available drinking water for its people

Back

shape, size,distance, direction

Front

four properties of maps

Back

site

Front

the physical character of a place.

Back

thematic maps

Front

Back

bid-rent curve

Front

a chart explaining land costs getting cheaper as you move away from the CBD

Back

borchert's model of urban evolution

Front

created in the 1960s to predict and explain the growth of cities in four phases of transportation history: stage 1, the "sail wagon" era of 1790-1830; stage 2, the "iron horse" era of 1830-1870; stage 3, the "steel rail" epoch of 1870-1920; and stage 4, the current era of car and air travel that began after 1920.

Back

sector model of urban land use

Front

predicts and explains north american urban growth patterns in the 1930s in a pattern in which similar land uses and socioeconomic groups clustered in linear sectors radiating outward from a CBD, usually along transportation corridora

Back

physiological density

Front

# of people per unit of arable land

Back

latin american city model

Front

Griffin-Ford model. Developed by Ernst Griffin and Larry Ford. Blends traditional Latin American culture with the forces of globalization. The CBD is dominant; it is divided into a market sector and a modern high-rise sector. The elite residential sector is on the extension of the CBD in the "spine". The end of the spine of elite residency is the "mall" with high-priced residencies. The further out, less wealthy it gets. The poorest are on the outer edge

Back

cbr

Front

the number of live births per year per 1,000 people

Back

ravenstein's laws of migration

Front

starting in the 19th century, ____________ helped geographers study migration based on the reasons why people move, distance they move and their characeristics

Back

chloropleth thematic maps

Front

Back

mercator projection map

Front

Back

categories of maps

Front

reference maps, thematic maps, isoline thematic maps, chloropleth thematic maps, proportional thematic maps, dot density maps, cartogram

Back

formal region

Front

an area in which everyone shares in one or more distinctive characteristics

Back

equidstant

Front

________ projections maintain distance, but distort other properties

Back

human geography

Front

concerned with spatial analysis of human patterns on earth and their interaction with he earth

Back

arithmetic density

Front

# of people divided by land area

Back

proportional thematic maps

Front

Back

cartogram

Front

Back

absolute location

Front

the identification of a place by some precise and accepted system of coordinates

Back

level of data aggregation

Front

size of geographic units on a map

Back

burgess' concentric zone urban land use model

Front

a model of the internal structure of cities in which social groups are spatially arranged in a series of rings

Back

relative location

Front

describes something's relationship to places around it

Back

agricultural density

Front

# of farmers per unit of arable land

Back

functional region

Front

an area organized around a node or focal point (ex. Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport)

Back

gravity model of spatial interaction

Front

when applied to migration, larger places attract more migrants than do smaller places. additionally, destinations that are more distant have a weaker pull effect than do closer opportunities of the same caliber.

Back

south asia

Front

second largest concentration of human life

Back

robinson projection map

Front

Back

demographic transition model

Front

Back

von thunen's model of agricultural use

Front

Back

hotelling's theory of locational interdependence

Front

________________________ asserts that an industry's locational choices are heavily influenced by the location of their chief competitors and related industries. in other words, industries do not make isolated decisions on locations without considering where other, related industries exist.

Back

isoline thematic maps

Front

Back

dot density maps

Front

Back

situation

Front

refers to location (or context) of a place relative to the physical and cultural characteristics around it

Back

perceptual region

Front

group of places linked together because of perceptions about those places

Back

christaller's central place theory

Front

explains and predicts patterns of urban places across the map. model analyzes hexagonal, hierarchical pattern of cities, villages, towns, and hamlets arranged to their varying degrees of centrality

Back

longitude

Front

distance east or west of the prime meridian

Back

epidemiological transition model

Front

distinctive causes of death in each stage of the demographic transition

Back

east asia

Front

largest concentration of human life

Back

urban realms model

Front

a simplified description of urban land use, especially descriptive of the modern North American city. it features a number of dispersed, peripheral centers of dynamic commercial and industrial activity linked by sophisticated urban transportation networks

Back

latitude

Front

distance north or south of the equator

Back

cultural ecology

Front

geographic approach that emphasizes human-environment relationships.

Back

movement, location, human environment interaction, place, region

Front

five themes

Back

azimuthal projection

Front

Back

rostows's stages of economic development

Front

1. traditional society (limited technology) 2. preconditions for take off (commercial exploitation of ag and extractive industry) 3. take off (manufacturing) 4. drive to maturity (wider industrial base & commercial base) 5. high mass consumption (comparative advantages in international trade)

Back

alfred weber's least cost theory

Front

explains and predicts where industries will locate based on cost analysis of transportation, labor, and agglomeration factors

Back

zelinsky model of migration transition

Front

migration trends follow demographic transition stages. People become increasingly mobile as industrialization develops. more international migration is seen in stage 2 as migrants search for more space and opportunities in countries in stage 3 and 4. stage 4 countries show less emigration and more intraregional migration

Back

harris' multiple-nuclei model of urban land use

Front

a model of the internal structure of cities in which social groups are arranged around a collection of nodes of activities

Back

Section 2

(6 cards)

equilibrium

Front

CBR and CDR are nearly equal and not moving in stage 1. this is called ___________

Back

stage 1 (low growth)

Front

high birth rate, high death rate, stable or slow increase of population; disease, famine, war; most people re subsistence farmers;

Back

stage 2 (expanding)

Front

Back

cdr

Front

the total number of deaths in a year for every 1,000 people alive in the society

Back

pandemic

Front

a disease that is geographically widespread and affects a large proportion of the population

Back

epidemic

Front

a widespread outbreak of an infectious disease

Back