Jewish Prayer Book

Jewish Prayer Book

Siddur (an approach to the Eternal Father)

Stephen Barnes (lvl 7)
Siddurim/Prayer books

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Union Prayer Book

Front

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Last updated

7 months ago

Date created

Feb 7, 2021

Cards (8)

Siddurim/Prayer books

(4 cards)

Union Prayer Book

Front

Reform Jewish Siddur

published 1961 New York, originally 1940

by the Central Conference of American Rabbis

Back

Siddur Sephardi HaShalom

Ghermoxian edition

Front

Sephardic siddur

published 2005 New York

Designed to be for inclusive for all Sephardim

Back

RCA edition Artscroll Siddur

Rabbinical Council of America

Front

Modern Orthodox Siddur/Prayerbook

Back

Siddur Nehalel

R' Jonathan Sacks version

Front

Orthodox siddur/prayerbook, Ashkenaz

published 2013

Back

Morning Prayers

(3 cards)

Modeh ani l'faneycha 

(I am thankful to YOU, living and everlasting King that YOU returned to me my soul with compassion.  Great is Your faithfulness.) Women say, Modah ani l'faneycha

Front

[Sephardic siddur] 

Said immediately upon arising.

Most traditions follow it with a washing of the hands, dedicating them to the Eternal's service.

Back

Netilat Yadayim

Front

[Sephardic siddur]

Prayer for washing of the hands, dedicating them to the Eternal's service.

R' Donin (To pray as a Jew) notes that the meaning of netilat is to raise the hands to HIM.

Back

Asher Yasar (Asher Yatzar)

Front

[Sephardic Siddur]

Prayer after using facilities to relieve oneself, acknowledging that the body is functioning as the Eternal intended, keeping us alive.

Back

General prayer

(1 card)

Baruch atah Ad-nai Elokeinu Melech haOlam...

The standard start of ... to the Most High

Front

Opening to most appeals to the Most High, forever blessed, acknowledging HIS governance over our world.

 

Convention since before 1 AD was to not pronounce the Divine Name.  Today we don't say most of the Names pointing to HIM, unless actually addressing HIM in prayer.  Instead, we use euphemisms that all understand as pointing to HIM while still showing respect.  Here we use the dash AND the word for an exalted Lord for the Divine 4-letter Name and use a K instead of a Ch.

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